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that the economies matter. i think whether it's been leon panetta, bob gates, admiral mullen, the constant focus on economic feminism, i don't know canada's net position with china, but it does raise this fundamental question of whether american debt is an asset or a liability. you know, the conference in dallas yesterday were recently, where someone made a comment that an american source of power to every different in the past that it defies the pentagon and the size american debt that we're too big to fail. deadhorse lake bigger problem than us. i be interested when you're anything about policy do you look at that as a source of leverage or does it strain american options tremendous a? >> steve, very simply, the u.s. situation with respect to our deficit and debt is a national security liability. we need our senior leadership. we need a senior leadership to take it on. we have an opportunity to do so. we have a requirement to do so. at the foundation of national power is ultimately economic comment and in terms of global influence, in terms of the ability to support a military, the economic is
here that is capable of fixing our problems. bob -- earlier this year, bob carr, foreign minister of australia -- one of our greatest allies in the world -- said -- and i quote -- that "the united states is one budget deal away from restoring its global preeminence." the u.s. is one budget deal away from restoring its global preeminence, perhaps because some -- i'm so proud of this country, i'd say we're one budget deal away from restoring our global dominance for a considerable number of years. unfortunately, after i hope and pray we adopt the result of the negotiations going on now and avoid the fiscal cliff, we'll still be one grand bargain, budget deal away from restoring our -- our global preeminence. that work has to be done. but at least we will have avoided the cliff. mr. president, by a twist of fate, the occupant of the chair is my colleague and friend, the senator from connecticut, so like -- you've probably seen these numbers, but just to bring it home in one state, what will be the impact if we go over -- if we allow the country to go over the fiscal cliff. in connect
the problems here, the father of the -- [inaudible] then like bob lovett and david bruce, smart guys. you've got a problem. and he says, you know, and you to get rid of dulles, allen does. his brother, john foster dulles, sector essay, a little harder to fire him, but more importantly, ike said it takes a strange kind of genius to run an intelligence service. and he's right about that. and allen dulles did have a strange kind of genius. so ike was reluctant to get rid of them. so he did. i think he regretted. susan's dad told me after the u2 got shut down he went to his father on the plane, the paris summit about to collapse her some, and said to him, dad, you should have fired back i. and ike blew up and basically said i'm the president and you're not. but it was little defensive about it because, yeah, he probably should have. these things are always clear in retrospect than they are at the time. ike was a great manager but he was arguably a little slow to get rid of people. he had no problem with sacking generals in world war ii, but maybe a little slow in his own administration in his
the audience through this. we have bob walk the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment that you make. you set my reporting over three decades has convinced me that we all need to recover a sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age when the molders of public opinion - against the hours that will to let them talk about the distinguished your times columnist tom friedman is labeled a flout world. instead little interest to readers to recruit decidedly unfashionable figures who will push of a heart against the notion that geography and a longer matters. so i want to just ask you to start with the basics of geography and tell us why the matter so decisively in the world. this is a pablumized by tom friedman's work greatly is what we can do is all the things. what i'm doing is saying find that human agency, that's fighting against things but what i'm showing you in this book is the other side, i'm not disagreeing with what they said but should i take back to the formidable barriers which if you do not respect you can never overcom
the vote we had a wonderful ceremony in the dirksen building honoring bob dole. you see, yesterday was the international disability rights day. international disability rights day yesterday. so they wanted to honor bob dole for all he'd done, and it was a wonderful event, wonderful. i saw people over there honoring bob dole for all the work he he'd done on disability rights who voted against the bill today. i saw them, i thought wait a minute, since they're going to honor all the work bob dole had done on disability and bob dole was one of the strongest supporters of the crpd as it's called, came over here today in his wheelchair with his wife, former senator elizabeth dole. and yet -- and yet people voted against it. i don't get it. veterans. mr. president, there was a young veteran sitting in the gallery today and i met him yesterday the first time, senator kerry spoke at length about him, his name is dan brzezinski and i'm going to ask consent to put his op-ed in the record at the conclusion of my speech. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. harkin: as i also want to pu
is unaccountable, saturday night at 10:00 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. >>> pennsylvania senator bob casey on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his un
president, and like bob lovett, david bruce, smart guys, warn him, you got a problem here, and he says, you know, and you ought to get rid of dallace. he's the brother of john foster, secretary of state, but more important, really, he says it takes a strange kind of genius to run and intelligence service, and he's right about that, and allen did have a strange genius so ike was reluctant to get rid of them, begs to question to replace with whom? he did. i think he regretted it. john eisenhower told me that after the u2 was shot down, he went to his father on the plane to the paris summit about to collapse, the paris summit, and said to him, dad, you should have fired that guy, and ike blew up and basically said i'm the president of the united states, but it was a little defensive about it because, you know, he probably should have gotten rid of dulles. they are clearer in retrospect than they are at the time. ike was a great manager, but he was arguably a little slow to get rid of people. i think not in world war ii, no problem with sacking generals in world war ii, but maybe a little slow
in michigan, one of the fellows i met there was bob dole, and we became good friends, even to this day. and when i asked him, what are your plans, and he, without hesitating said, i'm going to be a county clerk. after that, i'm going to run for the state house. of course, first opening in congress, that's where i'm going. i figure that's a good idea. so i went to law school. i became assistant prosecutor. when the territorial office became available, i ran for that office. and when stated came along, i got to congress. a little ahead of bob. >> you were in the territorial legislature then before you became -- >> two terms in the house and part of a term in senate spent and then came here as a member of the house. and who did you come here with at that time? >> the house had one member. >> you mentioned senator dole, and the fact that you had been in the hospital with him in michigan. it's amazing that some of these friendships were formed long before any public service, norma minetta talks about being a friend of, excuse me, the sender from wyoming, al simpson, and meeting him when he
, he said. i met jim webb in my office not far from here. as a result of senator bob kerry asking me if i would spend some time with him, i was happy to do so, i'll never forget that meeting, just the three of us in the room. for those of us who have worked with bob kerrey, he was such -- he is and was such a vibrant person. it's almost mischievous, i guess is the way to put it. you could just tell how he had just a little touch of differentness. and when he brought him in to visit with me, i learned very quickly they were both warriors. bob kerrey, a navy seal, recipient of the medal of honor, and jim webb, as we've said, navy cross, two silver stars, two bronze stars. both veterans of the vietnam war. as we sat talking, it was obvious that they were both fighters, warriors, and jim certainly proved that in his 2006 campaign. the reason bob wanted me to visit with him is because jim webb had decided he wanted to run for senate. what did i think of it? well, i probably told jim what a lot of people told him -- you want to run for the senate? the election's right upon us. no, he said,
that they were going to firewall is off the ticket. it was run by bob hannigan the national chairman who ran the st. louis machine that got chairman rehab acted in 1940 and ed pauly. at holly was the kolshorn yet oil millionaire who said i went into politics when i realize it was cheaper to elect a new congressman to buy the old one. he leaders going to get indicted for good reason. >> host: his name is on the -- >> guest: the build alien -- the pavilion, exact way. they decided they would try to surround roosevelt with all the people who were hostile to wallace if wallace is on the ticket. in 1941 when henry luce made his famous speech wrote his editorial saying the 20th century's going to be the ends century and the united states is going to dominate the world economically and military old and culturally coming made a famous speech. the 20th century should not be the american century, should be the century the common man so what we need is the worldwide people's revolution in the tradition of the french, the american, the latin american and the russian revolution and called for ending impe
are largely standing on the sideline here. bob's organization put out an excellent report last week people should look at my organization. usip data private study. right now u.s. policy, also civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here or there was a desire among local forces including younger islamists who want to bring about changes in their political movement in for the large purse sitting on the sidelines here we need to do more. >> we need to move on to the q&a portion here. a few questions from the audience. if you have a question, research and peer to microphone circulating. 10 minutes before we begin to wrap a. >> my name is -- [inaudible] -- washington d.c. what's missing on discussions is the fact that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face the people. i wrote an article about this, who are very different than their fathers and grandfathers. which we should be focusing on. >> can make it to a question? >> -- something we should be focusing
to bob's recent book that when the cia brought the idea of this -- these drones, and he was recorded to have said kill the seniors, you americans worry about collateral damage and don't worry about things like that. of this is the first time in our young history we allowed foreign power to kill our citizens, for free, for nothing. at the same time, there's amazing initiative that come into place since the government has taken power so in 2009, last summer, we had the prevention of electronic crimes act, which applies to anyone of any nationality across pakistan, and carries jail sentences so if you have an e-mail address not registered in your fall name, that's a jail sentence of six months. if you are found guilty of spoofing or character assassinating the president, that's three years to 13 years. what constitutes that? is it a blog post? that's unclear. you also have this incredibly inept and criminal way the government has handled the floods. while the floods raged, they embarked on a pr join to the cross, dubai, france, england -- went back home for a bit, back to russia, imposs
him to in michigan, senator inouye made his two lifelong friends, one senator bob dole, who as we know, became majority leader here in the senate and the republican nominee for president of the united states. and his other lifetime friend is the late senator phil hart, who was known as the conscience of the senate and the hart building, the massive senate office building, is named after him. asked by his son why after being classified as an enemy alien he and the members of the 442nd fought so heroically, senator inouye said in his usual, calm man, for the children. and for the children there could be no finer role model than senator dan inouye. he was a recipient of the medal of honor, a congressional gold medal, the highest honor can bestow. he served the distinguished service cross, a bronze star for valor and, of course, a purple heart. dan inouye showed the same dedication in congress he displayed on if battlefield. i want to take just a little bit here, mr. president, and talk about a meeting that i had, i mentioned it very previously last night but it was ten days ago. i knew se
sons, mark, bob, john and david, and the entire lugar family, most of which is with us here in the galleries today. their strength and sacrifices have been indispensable to my public service. i'm also very much indebted to a great number of talented and loyal friends who have served with me in the senate, including, by my count, more than 300 senators, hundreds of personal and committee staff members, and more than a thousand student interns. in my experience, it is difficult to conceive of a better platform from which to devote one's self to public service and the search for solutions to national and international problems. at its best, the senate is one of the founders' most important creations. a great deal has been written recently about political discord in the united states, with some commentators judging that partisanship is at an all-time high. having seen quite a few periods in the congress when political struggles were portrayed in this way, i hesitate to describe our current state as the most partisan ever, but i do believe that as an institution, we have not live
republican senator bob corker discussed the january fiscal deadline at an event hosted by bloomberg government and deloitte consulting. see that at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine, but we have not coordinated care and all the services end up having so many cracks at the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating. you've got to step back and ask, you know, are we hurting people overall? on a global level, what are we doing sometimes? of course now we've got the institute of medicine report pain 30% of everything we do may not be necessary and health care. when we step back from a 30% of all the medications are prescribed come to test the order come, the procedures, this is something i think, which is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> defense secretary, leon panetta went to walter reed military medical center to celebrate the hospital's first anniversary and to pay tribute to medical professionals in the military. the hospital was created out of the merger of walter reed army medical center
morning. >> host: good morning, bob. >> caller: question. this is a topic that nobody wants to talk about. the interest-rate cut the interest that is paid on the national debt. presently most of our debt is under short term, under 1%. and it's manipulated, of course, by the federal reserve and treasury department. so it's going to go from say 250 billion interest payments up to 7%, the next several years. one half trillion dollars in interest annually on the national debt. wondering, how is that going to impact our military industrial complex in the near future when that actually comes to be? >> that clearly -- the ticking time bomb for any part of the federal government and probably because of. [indiscernible] , the state government. we are in a time of unusually low interest rates. it will continue for a time, but when they rise it is going to be a body blow to the national politics and the country because, as your caller was indicating, the jump from 1% to 7% is such a massive increase in taxes that the only thing i can think of is, can you say greece? >> host: what does it mean for th
can can. >> yes, bob british medical journal. most has been about the impact on the federal budget and balancing one pocket versus another. what analysis has been done on say on the exchanges on the complicate of the employability of seniors if an employer has to carry these additional costs for an extended period of time? my high hypothesis would be may would make them less employable in some ways, either that or hasten the flight away from employers even providing insurance. on the consumer side how would these increase cost effect access to care and probably qlt of care? >> paul, you want to start? >> sure. on your first question, i have actually not heard anyone or any of the studies suggest extending medicare eligibility age might hasten the point where employers might not have coverage at all. what i was trying to add earlier a majority outside of the industries where retire -- the effect of the age would be that at the margin there will be some employees that would continue in the work force longer because the subsidize they were seeing from the employer for health insurance
they took him to in michigan, senator inknew -- senator ininouye, two phones, bob dole, and the republican nominee for president of the united states, and this other lifetime friend is senator phil hart, who was known as the conscience of the senate,, a massive senate office building named after him. senator said in his usual calm manner, for the children. and for the children there could be no finer role model than senator dan inouye. congressional gold medal. highest honor congress can bestow, the distinguished service cross, bronze star for valor, and of course, a purple hurt. dan inouye showed the same dedication in congress as he displayed on the battle field. i want to take just a little bit here, mr. president, and talk about a meeting i had -- i mentioned it briefly last night, but it was ten days. i knew that senator inouye was not feeling well, so i went down to his office, and he has a remarkable office. it's a beautiful office. but there isn't one single frame on the wall depicting what great man he is. there are no awards, there are no commemorative statues, all he has in his
minded enough, clear-eyed enough about the russian. bob gates also, who moved over to national security. that little group kind of delayed the process i would say for about six months. the people let state i think were ready to kind of progress, you know, with what had been achieved toward the end of the second reagan administration. but it just really delayed things, because the person who turned that around, and he also deserves a great deal of credit, was jim baker. jim baker did a great job putting together kind of an inter-agency management for this process and the different players and he spent a good deal of time, i would say a year and a half or two years, arrived in moscow with an entourage with the negotiators from cfd of the relevant assistant secretaries. broke them into working groups and i think that process that ros participated in with schivinovski and gorbachev but there was a delay and i don't think it set us back. i don't think there were any problems as a result of that. >> thank you. >> i was just going to say that james baker was named secretary of state the day af
.r.s., these are the numbers. since 1985, senator bob dole filled the tree -- used the gag rule -- seven times. senator byrd used it three times. senator mitchell used it three times. senator lott, when he was majority leader, used the gag rule 11 times. that is, cut off amendments. senator daschle only one time. senator frist, 15 times sm. those are the majority leaders. since 1985, awful those majority leaders -- all of those majority leaders used it a combined 40 times. our current majority leader, senator reid, has used it, as of yesterday, 69 times since he became leader in 2007. this trend, this gagging of the minority, is the primary cause of the senate's dysfunction. so, madam president, i wanted to correct the record. made a mistake and i'm glad to come. i don't want senator dole get the credit for that when senator byrd actually figured it out of and i want to leave a more -- i want to leave an optimistic -- i want to conclude with an optimistic point. i think most of us -- and i would include the distinguished senator from new hampshire in the chair because we've been together in discussions, bip
other young men, a soldier from kansas named bob dole, and one from michigan named phil hart. they formed a lifelong bond, one that endiewrd all the way to the u.s. senate. in 2003 when we dedicated that
of the senate foreign relations committee for her work, senator bob menendez on the foreign relations committee. all those were very instrumental in dealing with this. senator durbin who has been a real champion on human rights. i want to acknowledge kyle parker, a staff person from the helsinki commission who was very instrumental in the development of this legislation, and i want to also acknowledge senator lieberman's work. i know he will be speaking in a few minutes. it was senator lieberman and senator mccain and myself that first suggested that we should pass the magnitsky bill, it's the right thing to do, but we certainly shouldn't let pntr go without attaching the magnitsky bill. i want to thank senator lieberman and thank senator mccain for raising that connection. it was the right thing to do. first of all, it allowed us to get this human rights tool enacted. secondly, i think it gave us the best chance to get the pntr bill done in the right form. so i want to thank both of them for their leadership on that. in 1974, we passed the jackson vanik law. it dealt with the failure of the so
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22